Category Archives: internet

New shows on Moheak, KCHUNGradio

I’m thrilled to kick off 2012 with the announcement that I’m now hosting two online radio shows! Many of you already know my obsession with new music and undying love for radio. I’m thrilled for the opportunity and feel at home being back on the air to share some great new tunes with you!

KCHUNG 1630am Chinatown // Kchungradio.org // Sundays 7-8pm Pacific Time

Moheak Radio // moheak.com // Wednesdays 6-7pm & 12am Pacific Time

Yay!

From the Archive – Designing the Web

old business card design, circa 1999

old business card design, circa 1999

When I was 19, I traveled to Paris for my second college internship (the first was as a photographers assistant in Cleveland. Not as glamorous as Paris, but I still learned a lot.)

For three months, I worked in the art department learning how to design websites while attempting to improve my French.

Over Memorial Day weekend I spent time going through some old files, and discovered these design mock-ups I had made.

It’s amazing that these were done 10 years ago. Check out the browser!

Most of the time, the designers were given a website to create from scratch. They’d fill me in on the specs, give me logos and other assets, then set me loose to create my own interpretation.

Continue reading

Music Video as Interactive Art: Arcade Fire

Arcade Fire, seminal indie band with the #7 record in the country (previously at #1), has teamed up with director Chris Milk and the good folks over at Google Chrome Experiments to create an interactive music video for the single We Used To Wait.

The first of it’s kind, the video utilizes Google maps + HTML 5 video, audio and canvas to present a multi-window, choreographed experience.

Simply enter the address of the house you grew up in and the feature takes it from there.

The experience was designed to work in Google Chrome, but seems to work in Safari too.

I’d rather not spoil anything – check it out for yourself, here!

http://www.arcadefire.com

http://www.chromeexperiments.com/arcadefire

Part 5: Getting to Know You

The other night was quite windy in here Santa Monica. It was 4am and I was wide awake and totally spooked.  I randomly posted how I was feeling to Twitter and noticed shortly thereafter that other west-siders were awake and acknowledging that they felt the same way.

This exchange comforted me somehow. It made me feel less neurotic about being freaked out by something so simple as wind.

It’s scary to think that everything I post is on record somewhere, but to participate I realize – like in a real world relationship – that it helps to open up.

I noticed that after posting more opinionated tweets or describing certain situations that my number of followers dramatically increased.  Offering up stuff I was working on, like  DJ mixes, helped too.

Make the experience personal and memorable and people will follow.

Just like the real world, the Twitterverse is full of amazing individuals who love to share their creations, thoughts and opinions.

Get to know your tweeples. Send them messages, read their blogs. You’ll become flattered by the types of people who follow you, and become inspired to offer more.  It makes participation more meaningful than communicating aimlessly in an anonymous online world.

Media for Everyone

social_media_clutter

Some say the decentralized nature of online communities creates an environment conducive to so-called socialist behavior. I wouldn’t say these tenets are examples of a new socialism* by any means. I think the medium contains too many overarching constituents to take into consideration before assigning it any sociological value.

Given my own experience with online communities I’d lean towards more of a populist approach* – and I also wonder:

Are there any underlying marxist elements at play when we think about how content is consumed?

Rapid technological advancement leads to costly hardware from iPhones, to gaming consoles, to media storage. On top of that, monthly bandwidth and data plans are required to make those things work.

Comcast employs a tier-based system of pricing models for various downstream and upstream bitrates. It’s recommended to have at least have a 1.5MB pull to watch video, a step or two above the most basic monthly package.

This ultimately leads to a pyramid of who can afford what. Are we leaving out those who have limited to no accessibility?

If so, how large will the rift be between the informed and uninformed?

In the print editon of July’s Wired, President Obama’s newly appointed CIO Vivek Kundra references online communities as the new public square where people will discuss government info soon to be released online.

He says that “...by democratizing data, the American people will be able to hold their government accountable, based on evidence rather than talk.”

This is great and the internet does act as a public forum – but only for those who know how to use it.  Will this create an elitist class of those who have means to access this information?

We live and work more efficiently than we did  5 years ago. We have the ability to get more done while constantly staying connected to each other and the rest of the world. In this seemingly decentralized and transparent public sphere we can stream documentaries for free under public domain, read about issues that affect us at the local and global level and then participate. We can even download a free weekly video update from our President.

Information we choose to receive is free and widely distributed. However hi-bandwidth is required to download podcasts, stream video, and move quickly from window to window. We need speedy hard drives and vast amounts of storage space with software that frequently needs to be updated. Not to mention the occasional tech support.

Will those who don’t have these things be left in the dark?

In an emergency, would people with the pricey smart phone have an advantage in avoiding a crisis situation?

If I were part of a Union and there’s activity happening online whereby I can participate in issues that matter to me, firstly I would want to know where to find about it. Secondly, I’d be inclined to participate.

Who are the technological evangelists empowering people of all classes to leverage the internet to their benefit?

The Media Access Project (MAP), Public Knowledge groups are just two of the public interest groups fighting for issues like the expansion of broadband, open access and net neutrality. The Center for Social Media encourages the promotion of a dynamic and engaged public through social media. There are many similar organizations out there (see links to a few below).

Maybe before taking on the herculean task of making government documents public, we should take additional steps to set up programs for public access and consumption.

Content-holders should be encouraged to offer lower bitrated streams of their media. Cities should create a rock-solid plan for municipal wi-fi. Community colleges can offer free classes showing people how to navigate RSS feeds and publish online. We need to leverage new media to somehow to become a voice for all, rather than a privileged novelty for some.

More:

http://www.mediaaccess.org

http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org

http://www.publicknowledge.org

http://freeculture.org

http://www.media-democracy.net

http://www.democraticmedia.org

http://www.freepress.net

http://www.wired.com/culture/culturereviews/magazine/17-06/nep_newsocialism

http://www.wired.com/politics/onlinerights/magazine/17-07/mf_cio

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivek_Kundra

*-

http://www.nicolecifani.com/2008/11/twitter-facebook-and-fox-news-oh-my-or-how-i-was-seduced-by-the-internet-on-election-night/

http://www.nicolecifani.com/2008/10/hacking-the-debate/

Trackback for Facebook readers: http://www.nicolecifani.com/2009/08/media-for-everyone

The Media Access Project (MAP) and Public Knowledge group are just two of the public interest groups fighting for issues like the expansion of broadband, open access and net neutrality. The Center for Social Media encourages the promotion of a dynamic and engaged public through social media. There are many similar organizations out there (see links below).
Maybe before taking on the herculean task of making government documents public, we should take additional steps to set up programs for public access.
Content-holders should be encouraged to offer lower bitrated streams of their media. Cities should create a rock-solid plan for municipal wi-fi. Community colleges can offer free classes showing people how to navigate RSS feeds and publish online. We need to leverage new media to somehow to become a voice for all, rather than a privileged novelty for some.
More:
http://www.mediaaccess.org/
http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org
http://www.publicknowledge.org/
http://freeculture.org/
http://www.media-democracy.net/
http://www.democraticmedia.org/
http://www.freepress.net/
http://www.wired.com/culture/culturereviews/magazine/17-06/nep_newsocialism
http://www.wired.com/politics/onlinerights/magazine/17-07/mf_cio
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivek_Kundra
*-
http://www.nicolecifani.com/2008/11/twitter-facebook-and-fox-news-oh-my-or-how-i-was-seduced-by-the-internet-on-election-night/
http://www.nicolecifani.com/2008/10/hacking-the-debate/