Tag Archives: iphone

How To Build A Successful Marketing Stack In The New App Economy

white iPhone

There are many ways to drive users consistently to your app while delivering exactly what they want in the form of an entertaining and – if you’re lucky – addictive in-app experience. Based on your initial target market along with what you learn about your users, all it takes is a series of steps that are tactical, measurable, and scalable in methodology.

While your business needs must always be tied directly to your implementation plan, there are many things you can do to interact directly with your core user base while simultaneously reaching target market groups.

Here are 5 key steps to get there:

1. Know and Serve Your Audience

Beyond Google Analytics and platform-specific marketing tools, tap into the social media earpiece to speak with and listen to your core user base.

Outside of basic affinity metrics, what are their interests? What do they want, and most importantly what do they care about? Do you attract design nerds, community lovers, foodies, music fans – perhaps a combination of several of these groups?

What daily problems do they face, and how can you help solve them through technology? By learning about your audience, you’ll best be able to draw conclusions about what type of content to create and experiences to deliver and thereby stay one step ahead of the game.

Target markets are the measurable, critical component that ultimately drive app growth. The key is to hook these users early by delivering exactly what they want (or something close to it) while consistently keeping yourself in their digital spheres by leveraging the channels where they hang out the most.

After that, the real fun begins – this is where you can work on bringing the somewhat-to-average app user to ultimate fan status.

2. Deliver, Deliver, Deliver

Related to #1, you should provide users with exactly what they want. Deliver items tied to their interests, and you will open the door to increased usage, upsells, and app growth.

Don’t forget that your #1 marketing channel is word of mouth. This directly contributes to the velocity of the number of downloads acquired and is also a key metric for visibility in the iTunes app store in terms of store ranking and feature placement.

Seed content by hiring top-tier and relevant storytellers to expand your reach on blogs and social media. Create engaging content – and don’t worry about the rules. Create Instagram content just as cool as your friends would create. Reach out to influencers through various platforms (again, where they hang out), and you’ll wind up with a channel that can create significant impact.

3. Embrace the Funnel

Tap into how people are using your app. User behavior is telling, from the newbie to the frequent user. Examine where they drop off and investigate why it happens. If your on-boarding screen is collecting the correct information, you already have basic contact info available. This creating an easy entry point to remarket by offering incentives to return for more, which leads to the following…

4. Don’t Be Afraid to Pivot

Stay true to your product roadmap, but always be available and willing to ask questions. If something isn’t working and you receive the same feedback time and time again, the suggestion may be worth acting upon.

If a feature recommendation comes to the table that actually makes sense, that’s a terrific thing. And it’s free feedback! Let that feedback gently inform your product roadmap, and keep iterating on the product with this information in mind.

5. Utilize Tools with Built-in Engagement Mechanisms

Facebook bought Parse for a reason – they are now directly tied to developers and thus can make the development process of integrating with Facebook simple. Twitter and Google are also in the game of making significant investments in tools that provide easy access to app analytics, built-in promotional tools, and other strategies that provide natural stepping stones into proprietary advertising platforms that drive app downloads, which in turn drives revenue (Facebook earned $1.95 billion in Q3 2014 on mobile ads alone).

While it’s been proven that buying ads on Facebook works well, further evidence shows that content-driven engagement will always be of interest. Combined with the above tactics – examining user behavior, knowing and serving your audience, creating original content, and not being afraid to pivot – you can leverage many tools that lead to the promotion and distribution of a highly successful app.

Thoughts on Geolocation, Privacy, And The Advancement Of Technology

Apple and Google are both being sued under the recent discovery that the iPhone and Android smartphones track users wherever they go. 

Apple stated that they have never tracked users’ locations, but admitted to a bug that inherently collects user data by logging a complete history of travels by way of timestamped latitude and longitude. This week, they announced a software update that prevents the iPhone and iPad from storing these movements.

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The First Location-Aware Album: Bluebrain Presents ‘The National Mall’

The Washington D.C.-based band Bluebrain are the first to create a site-specific album that responds directly to listener location. Taking cues from The National Mall in downtown D.C., the album syncs songs and melodies to a listener’s location as they travel to various zones within the Mall.

The album will be delivered as an iPhone app and works by tracking a users location via the phone’s built-in GPS feature. Hundreds of zones within the Mall are tagged, and the sound plays according to where the listener is located in proximity to them. The zones overlap presenting standalone melodies, rhythms, instrumentation and pace specifically designed for each.

Separated from cultural and historical reference, the album pushes the boundaries of deconstruction not only in song but in the way a very album can be produced and presented.

The National Mall is the first in a series. Upcoming works include audio designs for Prospect Park in Brooklyn, New York, and a piece that will stretch the entire length of California’s Highway 1.

For more: www.bluebra.in

This post is syndicated from Yahoo! Music AS HEARD ON

Media for Everyone

social_media_clutter

Some say the decentralized nature of online communities creates an environment conducive to so-called socialist behavior. I wouldn’t say these tenets are examples of a new socialism* by any means. I think the medium contains too many overarching constituents to take into consideration before assigning it any sociological value.

Given my own experience with online communities I’d lean towards more of a populist approach* – and I also wonder:

Are there any underlying marxist elements at play when we think about how content is consumed?

Rapid technological advancement leads to costly hardware from iPhones, to gaming consoles, to media storage. On top of that, monthly bandwidth and data plans are required to make those things work.

Comcast employs a tier-based system of pricing models for various downstream and upstream bitrates. It’s recommended to have at least have a 1.5MB pull to watch video, a step or two above the most basic monthly package.

This ultimately leads to a pyramid of who can afford what. Are we leaving out those who have limited to no accessibility?

If so, how large will the rift be between the informed and uninformed?

In the print editon of July’s Wired, President Obama’s newly appointed CIO Vivek Kundra references online communities as the new public square where people will discuss government info soon to be released online.

He says that “...by democratizing data, the American people will be able to hold their government accountable, based on evidence rather than talk.”

This is great and the internet does act as a public forum – but only for those who know how to use it.  Will this create an elitist class of those who have means to access this information?

We live and work more efficiently than we did  5 years ago. We have the ability to get more done while constantly staying connected to each other and the rest of the world. In this seemingly decentralized and transparent public sphere we can stream documentaries for free under public domain, read about issues that affect us at the local and global level and then participate. We can even download a free weekly video update from our President.

Information we choose to receive is free and widely distributed. However hi-bandwidth is required to download podcasts, stream video, and move quickly from window to window. We need speedy hard drives and vast amounts of storage space with software that frequently needs to be updated. Not to mention the occasional tech support.

Will those who don’t have these things be left in the dark?

In an emergency, would people with the pricey smart phone have an advantage in avoiding a crisis situation?

If I were part of a Union and there’s activity happening online whereby I can participate in issues that matter to me, firstly I would want to know where to find about it. Secondly, I’d be inclined to participate.

Who are the technological evangelists empowering people of all classes to leverage the internet to their benefit?

The Media Access Project (MAP), Public Knowledge groups are just two of the public interest groups fighting for issues like the expansion of broadband, open access and net neutrality. The Center for Social Media encourages the promotion of a dynamic and engaged public through social media. There are many similar organizations out there (see links to a few below).

Maybe before taking on the herculean task of making government documents public, we should take additional steps to set up programs for public access and consumption.

Content-holders should be encouraged to offer lower bitrated streams of their media. Cities should create a rock-solid plan for municipal wi-fi. Community colleges can offer free classes showing people how to navigate RSS feeds and publish online. We need to leverage new media to somehow to become a voice for all, rather than a privileged novelty for some.

More:

http://www.mediaaccess.org

http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org

http://www.publicknowledge.org

http://freeculture.org

http://www.media-democracy.net

http://www.democraticmedia.org

http://www.freepress.net

http://www.wired.com/culture/culturereviews/magazine/17-06/nep_newsocialism

http://www.wired.com/politics/onlinerights/magazine/17-07/mf_cio

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivek_Kundra

*-

http://www.nicolecifani.com/2008/11/twitter-facebook-and-fox-news-oh-my-or-how-i-was-seduced-by-the-internet-on-election-night/

http://www.nicolecifani.com/2008/10/hacking-the-debate/

Trackback for Facebook readers: http://www.nicolecifani.com/2009/08/media-for-everyone

The Media Access Project (MAP) and Public Knowledge group are just two of the public interest groups fighting for issues like the expansion of broadband, open access and net neutrality. The Center for Social Media encourages the promotion of a dynamic and engaged public through social media. There are many similar organizations out there (see links below).
Maybe before taking on the herculean task of making government documents public, we should take additional steps to set up programs for public access.
Content-holders should be encouraged to offer lower bitrated streams of their media. Cities should create a rock-solid plan for municipal wi-fi. Community colleges can offer free classes showing people how to navigate RSS feeds and publish online. We need to leverage new media to somehow to become a voice for all, rather than a privileged novelty for some.
More:
http://www.mediaaccess.org/
http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org
http://www.publicknowledge.org/
http://freeculture.org/
http://www.media-democracy.net/
http://www.democraticmedia.org/
http://www.freepress.net/
http://www.wired.com/culture/culturereviews/magazine/17-06/nep_newsocialism
http://www.wired.com/politics/onlinerights/magazine/17-07/mf_cio
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivek_Kundra
*-
http://www.nicolecifani.com/2008/11/twitter-facebook-and-fox-news-oh-my-or-how-i-was-seduced-by-the-internet-on-election-night/
http://www.nicolecifani.com/2008/10/hacking-the-debate/